Saturday, February 27, 2010

Benzene In The Water Supply






An Associated Press review has found that an environmental contractor considerably underreported the level of a cancer-causing chemical found in tap water at Camp Lejeune, then omitted it altogether as the Marine base prepared for a federal health review.

According to recently disclosed studies, the Marine Corps had been warned nearly a decade earlier about the treacherously high levels of benzene, which was traced to massive leaks from fuel tanks at the base on the North Carolina coast.

There has been an unusually high amount of cancer cases at the camp. A test done in 1984 first picked up the high levels of the toxic substance in its original report. But by 1992, the federal Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease, an arm of the Department of Health and Human Services, showed up at the base to begin a health risk assessment. That's when a third contractor, the Michael Baker Corp., released a draft report on the feasibility of fixing the overall problem.

Apparently the 1984 level was on the well of 380 parts per billion and it had changed to 38 parts per billion. The company's final report on the well, issued in 1994, made no mention of the benzene. And the reports of the benzene levels just got worse overtime.

According to the EPA Benzene, a carcinogen is a natural part of crude oil and gasoline. Drinking water containing high levels of it can cause vomiting, dizziness, sleepiness, convulsions, and death and long-term exposure damages bone marrow, lowers red blood cells and can cause anemia and leukemia.

It’s just sad to see that those trying to serve and protect our country are being treated this way with absolutely no respect for their health and safety.



But today former Marines and Camp Lejeune residents continue to fight for a compensation program and to fund a mortality study that would determine if Marines and sailors who were exposed to these contaminants suffer from a higher death rate. The Senate passed legislation in September backed by Sens. Richard Burr, R-N.C., and Kay Hagan, D-N.C., preventing the military from dismissing claims related to water contamination pending completion of the several studies, including the mortality study.

Saturday, February 13, 2010

Have you seen this crazy ad?

Ok, so there is a three-and-a-half minute ad circulating funded by Carly Fiorina's campaign for the California Senate. This ad is squarely aimed at her Republican opponent Tom Campbell, a former Congressman and Stanford law professor. 


Watching this ad gave me the creeps as the soft spoken announcers speak sarcastically about a "wholesome and honorable" Tom Campbell, turns into lightening flashing and demon eyed wolves dressed disguised as a sheep among an unsuspecting herd. 


It's really out there in the creepy psychedelic way. But after thinking about it the ad is drawing a lot of attention to the candidates. Maybe the ad was a genius move?




Friday, February 5, 2010

The Tea Party Revolution






The Tea Party has been heating up talk about the next election. And no, I’m not talking about the Canadian rock band, but a political Party that has already sparked interest by both the Democrat and Republican Parties. Some of the faces of the two leading political Parties are looking into the complaints and the concerns that the Patriots of the newly rising Party have expressed and are trying to get in on the action. Politicians like Sarah Palin are looking in to see how far the Party can achieve before the 2012 election.



Members of The Tea Party Patriots have been protesting and voicing their concerns all of the country, speaking at rallies and gathering support from many frustrated people fed up with tax increases.


The Party focuses its concerns on fiscal responsibility, enforcing a constitutionally limited government and they push for free markets. Already people have taken notice to this fast rising political Party, and I’m just wondering if they’ll end up having someone representing their movement in the actually election.



Is this the future of American politics?